Category Archives: sedona hotels

Looking for a Sedona B&B? Canyon Villa Inn offers a truly memorable experience.

The ancients designed with great precision sacred places on the earth to mark and celebrate the passing of one season into the next. In a similar way, Canyon Villa was custom designed with the precise intention of perfectly capturing and framing the visual feast of Sedona’s Red Rocks.

This casual yet elegant Sedona bed and breakfast is a place to just be…to breathe…to join in or retreat in complete solitude. The choice is yours and our caring staff will gently enable all that you desire for your beyond-memorable experience.

“We loved the panoramic views!” – Punta Gorda, Florida Guests
“The Inn is stunning and quiet, with gorgeous views of the rocks.” – San Francisco, CA Guests
“What a wonderful place to stay!”
– Reno, NV Guests

Whether it’s booking advanced reservations for a fine dining experience in Sedona, arranging jeep tours in Sedona and Northern Arizona, sightseeing in Oak Creek Canyon and the Verde Valley, horseback riding and balloon adventures in the red rocks… or simply hiking into the Coconino National Forest a few steps off the property, all of us here at Canyon Villa are here to help you.

Among bed and breakfasts in Sedona, we believe Canyon Villa to be a true value in premier Arizona lodging, offering modern yet classic B & B accommodations, a wonderful cuisine, a sparkling outdoor glass-tile pool, splendid gardens, private patios, and magnificent red rock views second to none. We look forward to sharing this “special space” in Sedona with you and the wonderful guests who gather here daily from all over the world. We hope to see you soon.

 

"What's Old is New Again" at the Slide Rock Apple Festival September 19 & 20

From 9 am  – 4 pm on September 19th and 20th, Sedona’s well-known Slide Rock State Park will host the Slide Rock Apple Fest. This extensive events draws thousands of visitors each year to come and experience a piece of Sedona’s apple-growing history.

A celebration of Oak Creek’s agricultural and farming history, the Slide Rock Apple Fest is a two-day event with live music, activities for children and adults, food, arts & crafts, natural exhibitions, educational booths, homesteading demonstrations and lectures about sustainability. The Apple Festival activities will include apple-sorting demonstrations, cornhole and a beer garden, face painting, children’s arts & crafts, apple-themed activities, history walks, live demonstrations, an apple cooking contest (see below), a dessert auction and music including performances by Red Rock Country Band and Porchlights. A Plein Air “Paint Out” will also take place at the event.

Slide Rock State Park, originally the Pendley Homestead, is a 43-acre historical apple farm located in Oak Creek Canyon. Frank L. Pendley, having arrived in the canyon in 1907, formally acquired the land under the Homestead Act in 1910. Due to his pioneering innovation, he succeeded where others failed by establishing a unique irrigation system still in use by the park today. This allowed Pendley to plant his first apple orchard in 1912, beginning the pattern of agricultural development that has dominated the site since that time.

The park is named after the famous Slide Rock, a stretch of slippery creek bottom adjacent to the homestead. Visitors may slide down a slick natural water chute or wade and sun along the creek. The swim area is located on National Forest land which is jointly managed by Arizona State Parks and the U.S. Forest Service. Together these areas have seen the making of many Hollywood movies such as “Broken Arrow” (1950) with James Stewart, “Drum Beat” (1954) with Alan Ladd and Charles Bronson, “Gun Fury” (1953) with Rock Hudson and Donna Reed, and a scene from “Angel and the Badman” (1946) with John Wayne.

Fees and Tickets: Vendor Booths $50 (limited space available call 928-282-1418); Entrance Fee – $8 per car load, or take the free trolley and receive a complimentary ticket. Volunteers are needed for this event. This event is sponsored by the Friends of Slide Rock State Park, a local non-profit group dedicated to protecting, preserving and promoting appreciation and enjoyment of the historical, ecological, scientific, recreational and cultural resources of Slide Rock State Park.

Trolley Stops: Go Green: Take the free trolley from one of 3 pick-up points in Sedona and receive a complimentary ticket to the event. Trolley runs from 9 am to 4 pm.

Baked Goods Show: All entries in the Slide Rock Apple Fest’s Food Contests must include apples in the ingredient list. This includes, but is not limited to, whole apples, apple flavoring, sauces or jellies.

For a complete listing of the best Sedona Events, visit our Sedona.tv Sedona Calendar of Events.
Photos by Kathy Pendley Shaw and Sharon Mott.

Touching Documentary "Mine" Makes Arizona Premiere on Sept. 8

Film Festival Presents Award-Winning Film Around the Anniversary of Hurricane Katrina

Director/Producer Geralyn Pezanoski will be in Sedona to host screenings and Q&A discussions
The multiple award-winning documentary “Mine” makes its Arizona Premiere in Sedona on Tuesday, Sept. 8. The event is scheduled to coincide with the anniversary of Hurricane Katrina which sets the backdrop of the powerful, touching and thought-provoking film. There will be two screenings of the film at 4:00 and 7:00 p.m. at Harkins Sedona Six Theatres. “Mine” is the second film in the Sedona International Film Festival’s four-week “What’s Up, Doc?” Documentary Series featuring award-winning documentaries from festivals around the world.
Director and producer Geralyn Pezanoski will be in Sedona to host the premiere and conduct Q&A discussions following both screenings.
“This film will resonate with all animal lovers and pet owners, as well as anyone with an interest in humanity,” said festival operations director Debbie Williams. “It is sure to be one of the most moving and touching documentaries you will see, taking you on an emotional roller coaster.”
“Mine” is the powerful story about the essential bond between humans and animals told against the backdrop of one of the worst natural disasters in U.S. history. The film explores how tragedy intensifies that bond and is told from the perspective of original guardians, rescuers, and adoptive parents of the voiceless victims of Katrina. These individuals are all connected by two things, the tragic aftermath of Katrina and their love of animals.
In response to an unprecedented crisis, thousands of pets were transported around the country and adopted even when their displaced guardians were still desperately looking for them. Meanwhile, many adoptive guardians had forged strong bonds with their new pets, nurturing them back to health from the traumas they suffered during and after the storm.
When two families love the same pet, conflicts inevitably arise over who is the rightful “owner” and what is right for the animal. At the center of this tension are pets who are loved like family, but by law are considered property. This begs the question, who is looking out for the best interest of the animals? Set in a post-Katrina landscape of poverty, loss and moral uncertainty, “Mine” presents the complexity of an intensely emotional situation that has no simple answers.
A tragedy of this scale reveals the worst and brings out the best in humankind and presents an opportunity for us to bring about meaningful social change. “Mine” is a compelling, character-driven story that challenges us see the way we treat animals in our society as a reflection of how we treat ourselves – and each other.
“Like millions across the country I was profoundly affected by the startling images I witnessed during coverage of Hurricane Katrina: people stranded on rooftops, suffering crowds at the Super Dome, and the decimation of one of America’s most culturally vibrant and diverse cities,” said producer/director Geralyn Pezanoski. “And like millions of others I was devastated as well by images of the thousands of animals in distress – their helplessness bringing into even greater relief the chaos and overwhelming scope of the tragedy. So when I read about a nascent but quickly growing rescue effort being carried out by animal lovers from across the country and the world, I decided to go to New Orleans to document this incredible undertaking.”
During the ensuing six weeks, Pezanoski filmed dozens of intrepid rescue workers, devoted animal rights advocates, and thousands of animals in need of saving – even after they were ‘rescued’. While a few residents trickled back into New Orleans and managed to reclaim their pets, most were displaced and barred from entering the city, so she watched day after day as these unclaimed animals were loaded onto trucks and planes and sent to shelters across the country, their fates uncertain.
Pezanoski herself fostered – and eventually adopted – a pointer mix she named Nola.
“As the months went on, my crew and I began to see an increasing number of residents returning to New Orleans to try to rebuild their lives. It became apparent that legions of them – people who had lost everything – were desperate to find their pets,” said Pezanoski. “We heard about hundreds of other cases across the county: people who were still displaced but on the hunt for their animals. But as broad and deep as the story went, there seemed to be strangely little information about it in mainstream media.”
Pezanoski had many questions: “Why hadn’t people been allowed to evacuate with their animals? Now that these animals were adopted into new homes, who had the authority to decide whether they should be left where they were or returned to their previous owners? Why were original owners running into such resistance in trying to find and reclaim their pets? What would I do if someone came looking for Nola, to whom I had become so attached?”
“I explored these questions and many more during the three years I spent making ‘Mine’. My primary focus was on a handful of extraordinary Katrina victims committed to finding their animals even years after the disaster, but the story extends to rescue workers and new adoptive guardians, who, like me, decided to take in pets left behind and care for them as their own,” said Pezanoski. “We met and interviewed hundreds of people over the years, and what emerged was a profound story of the bond between humans and animals, and the power of that bond to ameliorate human suffering. Equally striking, however, were stories both of the continuing prevalence of racism and classism in America, and the incredible power of compassion in the wake of tragedy.”
Preview the Film Here:

[youtube=http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=16AcjavOia8&hl=en&fs=1&color1=0x234900&color2=0x4e9e00]

The title sponsor for the event is the Humane Society of Sedona. All audience members attending the screenings of “Mine” are requested to bring a donation of dog or cat food for the Humane Society shelter here in Sedona. The lodging host sponsor is Los Abrigados Resort & Spa.
“Mine” will be shown at Harkins Sedona Six Theatres on Tuesday, Sept. 8 at 4:00 and 7:00 p.m. Tickets are $10, or $8 for Film Sedona members, and will be available starting at 3:00 p.m. that day in the Harkins lobby. Cash or checks only. Film Sedona members can purchase tickets in advance at the Sedona International Film Festival office, 1785 W. Hwy. 89A, Suite 2B, or by calling 282-1177. For more information, visit: http://www.sedonafilmfestival.com/.